What is counselling?

Counselling is a talking therapy that involves a trained therapist listening to you and helping you find ways to deal with emotional issues.

Sometimes the term “counselling” is used to refer to talking therapies in general, but counselling is also a type of therapy in its own right.

What can counselling help with?

Counselling can help you cope with:

  • a mental health condition, such as depression, anxiety or an eating disorder,
  • an upsetting physical health condition, such as infertility,
  • a difficult life event, such as a bereavement, a relationship breakdown or work-related stress,
  • difficult emotions; for example, low self-esteem or anger,
  • other issues, such as sexual identity.

What to expect from counselling

At your appointment, you will be encouraged to talk about your feelings and emotions with a trained therapist, who will listen and support you without judging or criticising.

The therapist can help you gain a better understanding of your feelings and thought processes, and find your own solutions to problems. But they do not usually give advice or tell you what to do.

You may be offered a single session of counselling, a short course of sessions over a few weeks or months, or a longer course that lasts for several months or years.

It can take a number of sessions before you start to see progress, but you should gradually start to feel better with the help and support of your therapist.

Get in touch via isva@idas.org.uk or ring our helpline on 03000 110 110.
“I just want to thank you. When I first came to you, I had nobody to talk to about the rape and you totally supported me through the whole process. You walked me all the way through everything and made sense of a horrible situation I was in and I don’t know how I would have managed alone. You literally saved my life.”